Hans Walor - Senior Designer

Hans WalorHans is an extremely diversified artist. His ability to quickly assimilate new information and identify relevant issues makes him a design genius. His background includes creating content for online channels - email, landing pages, and Website design. 

Brand identity, art gallery curation, music industry design and promotion, action sports design, and apparel design are other strong passions for Hans. Most recently Hans created large scale illustrations for zipline structures at Burning Man 2011 in the Black Rock desert of Nevada.

Hans graduated from the College of Architecture and Plannning from the University of Colorado Boulder. He brings open ingenuity, and a fresh way of thinking to the Airways team. He is currently living and working in Venice Beach, California.

Digital Media Produces Lots of Activity Yet Email is #1 for Producing Sales.

Friday, July 13, 2012 by Leslie Gabriel

 

Contributed by Joel Book , ExactTarget's Director of eMarketing Education 

Digital media has forever transformed how brands and consumers interact with each other. Online marketing has become a 24x7 multi-channel symphony designed to engage and inspire today’s hyper-connected consumer. And hopefully compel them to buy the brand’s product.

To visualize the “avalanche of digital activity” that is taking place between brands and consumers, business intelligence company DOMO paired up with Column Five Media to create this infographic to show what’s happening online every minute of every day,.  

digital activity

 

Email Design - Marketer Conclusion

Monday, April 5, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
Marketers, we advise you to know your subscribers, to understand what they want from you,
and to deliver your messages when and where your audience wants to receive them. We can’t
emphasize enough the importance of creating emails that render well across various email
clients and ISPs. 
 
If you’re looking for additional detail about how your team can put specific design tips into action, 
continue reading. ;-)

Email Design - View full email.

Monday, April 5, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
You’ve enticed your subscriber to view your entire email. Well done. But what will they see when reading your entire message? Nielsen Norman Group’s usability study (Email Newsletter Usability — Third Edition, June 2006) determined that users, once engaged, spend an average of 51 seconds on each newsletter in their inbox. With such a short time frame, how do you want your subscribers spending their time? Ensure your email is designed to guide a subscriber’s attention through the email to the conversion opportunity. If the conversion is to a website, it’s critical to create a consistently-branded experience for your subscribers through the email and landing page. 

Email Design - Opened Email (Pre-Scroll).

Monday, April 5, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
So, your subscriber clicks on your email and it opens in a new window. But how many of those subscribers view the entire email including the content “below the fold?” The answer is surprisingly few. The Nielsen Norman Group published a July 2006 study that noted only 11% of subscribers read the full email message.
 
What does that mean for marketers? Include plenty of high powered content “above the fold.” Consider using bullets, borders, or background colors to engage subscribers to scroll down. The content above the fold should create enough interest to encourage a subscriber to scroll down and ultimately convert. 

Email Design - Preview pane

Monday, April 5, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
Your email doesn’t necessarily have to be open for your subscribers to see the content. When present, many subscribers use preview panes to get a quick look at your message before they open it. As such, it’s important to make sure your call-to-action is visible in the preview pane. Preview pane sizes vary widely across email clients and ISPs, but our Design team recommends placing branding and the main call-to-action in the top left 4-5 inch square (between 288-360 pixels) of the email. 

Email Design - Make sure your subscribers recognize your from name.

Monday, April 5, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
Your email fights for attention in a crowded inbox. Do your subscribers immediately recognize the communication is from you? According to the Email Sender and Provider Coalition (ESPC), 73% of subscribers click “Report Spam” or “Report Junk” based on the content of the from field. Make sure your subscribers recognize your from name. Keep in mind, too, that some email clients still use your from email address in the inbox (i.e., company@domain.com instead of your “from name.”) Make sure it’s also branded and recognizable. 

Email Design - designing for the five stages of email viewing.

Monday, April 5, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
Proper email rendering can make a big difference, however, as subscribers tend to view your email in five separate stages—judging each one individually before deciding whether to move on. At each stage, subscribers will consider these factors: brand, urgency, value, and interest. The clincher? This decision making process will happen in a matter of seconds, so it’s vital to ensure the following elements are designed effectively. 
• From Name
• Subject Line
• Preview Pane
• Opened Email
• Full Email 

 

Measure and optimize your email campaigns.

Monday, April 5, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
After sending your emails, use key performance metrics to identify the level of success for each campaign. Every marketer’s key performance metrics will differ. Marketers might use a variety of data points to determine the success of their email design, including open rates, click-through rates, or unsubscribe rates. Conversion rates can also be combined with web analytics to measure an email campaign’s success, in addition to other statistics including subscriber retention, sales cycle, or downloads.

While there are a seemingly infinite number of metrics to monitor on each campaign, it’s important to measure those that support your overall business purpose. By measuring the success of your email design over time, you’ll be quick to spot which elements drive the most results. As the market, email clients, and your subscribers evolve, metrics will assist in pointing your design in the appropriate direction. 

Three important email design tips.

Wednesday, March 31, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
1. Keep your subject line under 49 characters. And remember, mobile users may see even fewer characters!

2. Ensure your from name is instantly recognizable by using the company name, product name, or sales associate your subscribers are most familiar with.

3. Place your primary call-to-action in the top left 4-5 inch square of your email so it's visible.

Email rendering — test, test, test.

Wednesday, March 31, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
It’s important to test your email design across multiple email clients and ISPs to ensure your subscribers see what you expect them to see in both the HTML and text versions. Testing design for rendering purposes is important, but it’s also critical to ensure that your design is effective—leading subscribers to convert and support the email’s business purpose.
 
Testing strategies prior to launching a send: “Once we have the email set to go, we send it to a couple of test accounts and check the results on different machines. We regularly check the email on both Mac and IBM, and test for various email clients such as AOL, Yahoo, Gmail, Outlook, Thunderbird, Apple Mail, and Lotus Notes.”
 
Complete and thorough testing, like that will help ensure the email rendering looks correct. An easy way to test the rendering of your email across several email clients at one time is through ExactTarget partner Pivotal Veracity’s eDesign Optimizer. This is very cool! By sending one email to a seed address, Pivotal Veracity’s report provides up to 25 views of your email in the top email clients. “Views” can include screenshots of your email with images on and off, in preview panes,
and on mobile devices. Let me know if you would like to see this in action.

Know your audience.

Wednesday, March 31, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
Different email design approaches need to be considered for different audiences. If your email list is comprised of common B2B (Business-to-Business) or B2C (Business-to-Consumer) domains, consider designing for the “lowest common denominator” of the average list. 

However, if you know that a majority of your subscribers are using a specific email client, or they all come from a region with a specific ISP, then it’s best to customize for them. Further still, if your email campaigns are sent primarily to an internal list, then you should optimize your email design for your internal clients.

Email marketing design and rendering.

Wednesday, March 31, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
Design is vital to the success of your email marketing program. But what does “good” email design really entail? How do you ensure your message is seen correctly by your subscribers? And who is ultimately responsible for the look and performance of your emails?
 
Is it Marketers? Designers? The answer is yes to both.
 
Marketers and designers play an integral role in the success of email marketing design.
Good email design is multi-faceted, and we can help you navigate the ins and outs with best practice recommendations. 

According to w3schools.com, the most common screen resolution is 1024 x 768 pixels—but this statistic doesn’t account for the varied groups of email recipients out there. Some recipients have multiple windows active in the same screen, while others operate two (or more) computer screens at once. Beyond various hardware scenarios, the myriad of different possible Internet Service Provider (ISP), email client, and browser combinations increases the potential for message rendering issues to arise.
 
ISPs and email client vendors continue to strive for differentiation in their product offerings. To date, many of these points of differentiation among email clients have had direct impacts on email rendering. While common standards would be nice, the reality is that marketers need to work in a complex environment and optimize rendering across the most pervasive email clients. 
Let's talk about email rendering across the most commonly-used email clients and ISPs.

The key to any element of your email marketing program is in the planning. Before you provide a creative brief to your design agency or internal design team, ensure that your email campaign supports the overall direction of your email program and the value proposition being offered to your subscriber.

As you begin planning your email design program, start by asking these questions:
 
• What is the business purpose of this email communication?
 
• How does this communication support the value we offer to our subscribers?
 
• Is email the best medium to communicate this message?
 
Once you have answers to these questions, we recommend building a wireframe, or a
“blueprint,” to ensure your content has strategic and hierarchical message placement.

Bruce Mau - words of inspiration...

Tuesday, March 30, 2010 by Hans Walor
Maybe you feel stuck in a rut with your current blog template design, social media marketing plan, or innovative email, and you just can't seem to get out of it or find any inspiration. Some words from Bruce Mau might just snap you right out of that funk. Take a look at the Incomplete Manifesto for Growth. Written in 1998, the Incomplete Manifesto is an articulation of statements exemplifying Bruce Mau’s beliefs, strategies and motivations. Collectively, they are a good way to approach almost any project. 

Bruce Mau

1. Allow events to change you.
You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them.

2. Forget about good.
Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you'll never have real growth.
 
3. Process is more important than outcome.
When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we've already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.
 
4. Love your experiments (as you would an ugly child).
Joy is the engine of growth. Exploit the liberty in casting your work as beautiful experiments, iterations, attempts, trials, and errors. Take the long view and allow yourself the fun of failure every day.
 
5. Go deep.
The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value.
 
6. Capture accidents.
The wrong answer is the right answer in search of a different question. Collect wrong answers as part of the process. Ask different questions.
 
7. Study.
A studio is a place of study. Use the necessity of production as an excuse to study. Everyone will benefit.
 
8. Drift.
Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.
 
9. Begin anywhere.
John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.
 
10. Everyone is a leader.
Growth happens. Whenever it does, allow it to emerge. Learn to follow when it makes sense. Let anyone lead.
 
11. Harvest ideas.
Edit applications. Ideas need a dynamic, fluid, generous environment to sustain life. Applications, on the other hand, benefit from critical rigor. Produce a high ratio of ideas 
to applications.
 
12. Keep moving.
The market and its operations have a tendency to reinforce success. Resist it. Allow failure and migration to be part of your practice.
 
13. Slow down.
Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.
 
14. Don’t be cool.
Cool is conservative fear dressed in black. Free yourself from limits of this sort.
 
15. Ask stupid questions.
Growth is fueled by desire and innocence. Assess the answer, not the question. Imagine learning throughout your life at the rate of an infant.
 
16. Collaborate.
The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.
 
17. ____________________.
Intentionally left blank. Allow space for the ideas you haven’t had yet, and for the ideas of others.
 
18. Stay up late.
Strange things happen when you’ve gone too far, been up too long, worked too hard, and you're separated from the rest of the world.
 
19. Work the metaphor.
Every object has the capacity to stand for something other than what is apparent. Work on what it stands for.
 
20. Be careful to take risks.
Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.
 
21. Repeat yourself.
If you like it, do it again. If you don’t like it, do it again.
 
22. Make your own tools.
Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference.
 
23. Stand on someone’s shoulders.
You can travel farther carried on the accomplishments of those who came before you. And the view is so much better.
 
24. Avoid software.
The problem with software is that everyone has it.
 
25. Don’t clean your desk.
You might find something in the morning that you can’t see tonight.
 
26. Don’t enter awards competitions.
Just don’t. It’s not good for you.
 
27. Read only left-hand pages.
Marshall McLuhan did this. By decreasing the amount of information, we leave room for what he called our "noodle."
 
28. Make new words.
Expand the lexicon. The new conditions demand a new way of thinking. The thinking demands new forms of expression. The expression generates new conditions.
 
29. Think with your mind.
Forget technology. Creativity is not device-dependent.
 
30. Organization = Liberty.
Real innovation in design, or any other field, happens in context. That context is usually some form of cooperatively managed enterprise. Frank Gehry, for instance, is only able to realize Bilbao because his studio can deliver it on budget. The myth of a split between "creatives" and "suits" is what Leonard Cohen calls a 'charming artifact of the past.'
 
31. Don’t borrow money.
Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.
 
32. Listen carefully.
Every collaborator who enters our orbit brings with him or her a world more strange and complex than any we could ever hope to imagine. By listening to the details and the subtlety of their needs, desires, or ambitions, we fold their world onto our own. Neither party will ever be the same.
 
33. Take field trips.
The bandwidth of the world is greater than that of your TV set, or the Internet, or even a totally immersive, interactive, dynamically rendered, object-oriented, real-time, computer graphic–simulated environment.
 
34. Make mistakes faster.
This isn’t my idea – I borrowed it. I think it belongs to Andy Grove.
 
35. Imitate.
Don’t be shy about it. Try to get as close as you can. You'll never get all the way, and the separation might be truly remarkable. We have only to look to Richard Hamilton and his version of Marcel Duchamp’s large glass to see how rich, discredited, and underused imitation is as a technique.
 
36. Scat.
When you forget the words, do what Ella did: make up something else ... but not words.
 
37. Break it, stretch it, bend it, crush it, crack it, fold it.
 
38. Explore the other edge.
Great liberty exists when we avoid trying to run with the technological pack. We can’t find the leading edge because it’s trampled underfoot. Try using old-tech equipment made obsolete by an economic cycle but still rich with potential.
 
39. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms.
Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces – what Dr. Seuss calls "the waiting place." Hans Ulrich Obrist once organized a science and art conference with all of the infrastructure of a conference – the parties, chats, lunches, airport arrivals – but with no actual conference. Apparently it was hugely successful and spawned many ongoing collaborations.
 
40. Avoid fields.
Jump fences. Disciplinary boundaries and regulatory regimes are attempts to control the wilding of creative life. They are often understandable efforts to order what are manifold, complex, evolutionary processes. Our job is to jump the fences and cross the fields.
 
41. Laugh.
People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I've become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.
 
42. Remember.
Growth is only possible as a product of history. Without memory, innovation is merely novelty. History gives growth a direction. But a memory is never perfect. Every memory is a degraded or composite image of a previous moment or event. That’s what makes us aware of its quality as a past and not a present. It means that every memory is new, a partial construct different from its source, and, as such, a potential for growth itself.
 
43. Power to the people.
Play can only happen when people feel they have control over their lives. We can't be free agents if we’re not free.

Signs your email program is behind the curve

Monday, February 15, 2010 by Rachel Jensen
Contributed by Chad White
 
Email marketing's high return on investment often breeds complacency -- and is often pointed to as both a blessing and curse. After all, why invest more in analytics, segmentation, and testing when the profits are already rolling in quite nicely?
 
Meanwhile, some companies realize that there's much more to be had from their email programs. They recognize the effect that a strong email program can have on other channels and on their brand reputation. They make smart investments in new capabilities and are constantly optimizing their processes, messaging and email designs. They're way ahead of the curve, leaving complacent competitors in the dust.
 
Here are a few signs that despite "good" results, your email program is getting lapped: View details

HOW- Design Conference

Monday, February 8, 2010 by Hans Walor

June 6-9, 2010
Denver, Colorado

Join HOW magazine in Denver for the 20th annual HOW Design Conference! This is your chance to spend several exhilarating days recharging your creative batteries, learning new design skills and discovering techniques for boosting your career. Best of all, it's a chance to connect with like-minded designers and learn from leading talent in the design community.
HOW Design Conference
Check out all the details at HOWconference.com! And be sure to register by the March 12 Early Bird date for significant savings on the full-conference program.

Then stay in touch via Twitter, Facebook, the HOW Conference blog and the HOW Conference Forum. Or sign up for the HOW Conference email newsletter here.
Registration


Know Your Audience.

Monday, January 11, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
Different design approaches need to be considered for different audiences. If your email list is comprised of common B2B (Business-to-Business) or B2C (Business-to-Consumer) domains, consider designing for the “lowest common denominator” of the average list. However, if you know that a majority of your subscribers are using a specific email client, or they all come from a region with a specific ISP, then it’s best to customize for them. Further still, if your email campaigns are sent primarily to an internal list, then you should optimize your email design for your internal clients. 


Effective Email Marketing Design

Monday, January 11, 2010 by Leslie Gabriel
According to w3schools.com, the most common screen resolution is 1024 x 768 pixels—but this statistic doesn’t account for the varied groups of email recipients out there. Some recipients have multiple windows active in the same screen, while others operate two (or more) computer screens at once. Beyond various hardware scenarios, the myriad of different possible Internet Service Provider (ISP), email client, and browser combinations increases the potential for message rendering issues to arise.
 
ISPs and email client vendors continue to strive for differentiation in their product offerings. To date, many of these points of differentiation among email clients have had direct impacts on rendering. While common standards would be nice, the reality is that marketers need to work in a complex environment and optimize rendering across the most pervasive email clients.
 
Overview
The key to any element of your email marketing program is in the planning. Before you provide a creative brief to your design agency or internal design team, ensure that your email campaign supports the overall direction of your email program and the value proposition being offered to your subscriber. As you begin planning your email design program, start by asking these questions:
 
• What is the business purpose of this email communication?

• How does this communication support the value we offer to our subscribers?

• Is email the best medium to communicate this message?
 
Once you have answers to these questions, we recommend building a wireframe, or a “blueprint,” to ensure your content has strategic and hierarchical message placement.

No juniors here.

Friday, November 13, 2009 by Leslie Gabriel
Let's face it, your marketing firm is only as good as the people who work on your campaign. Airways has assembled teams of experienced marketing, creative and technical professionals representing the most relevant experience today.

So if you're looking to improve organic search traffic, design smarter email, or need some coaching on excellent offer planning we've got the team you've been looking for.
 

Our teams design, execute and manage high performance marketing solutions serving many vertical markets. We create maximum customer value from our client's marketing investment. No juniors here.